What Happens When You Elect Women, According To Science

What Happens When You Elect Women, According To Science

“Women are front and center this election, in part because a woman, Hillary Clinton, is front and center. Online, the conversation plays out again and again: What’s the real significance of electing the first female president? Is the symbolism itself revolutionary? Are the young women who don’tendorse Clinton betraying the sisterhood — or conversely, are the women who do support her following her blindly? What should it mean to voters that she could be the first woman in history to lead the United States?

“Women in politics,” however, means far more than just Hillary Clinton herself. America is 50 percent female. Congress, currently at a record high for gender diversity, is still only 19 percent female (and just 6 percent women of color).

This year has a potential to be a watershed for women’s representation: Hundreds of women are vying for Senate and House seats. Six women are running for governor. Not all of them will make it to November, but even so this election has the potential to bring more women to national leadership positions than ever before.

Plus, there’s evidence that electing more women is something that could make a real difference for the country as a whole. Here’s what we know from the recent research in psychology, political science, and economics…”

[x_button shape=”square” size=”regular” float=”none” href=”http://thinkprogress.org/politics/2016/04/29/3772383/science-of-why-electing-women-matters/?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=tptop3&utm_term=3&utm_content=53&elqTrackId=a589f8c86045498f895c07602d19ab76&elq=1eb4a78a188e4e928fd64285ae7b87d0&elqaid=29967&elqat=1&elqCampaignId=5532″ title=”What Happens When You Elect Women, According To Science” target=”blank” info=”none” info_place=”top” info_trigger=”hover”]Read the full article[/x_button]

The power of parity: Advancing women’s equality in the United States

The power of parity: Advancing women’s equality in the United States

“The United States could add up to $4.3 trillion in annual GDP in 2025 if women attain full gender equality. In a new report, The power of parity: Advancing women’s equality in the United States, the McKinsey Global Institute (MGI) finds that every US state and city can add at least 5 percent to their GDP in that period by advancing the economic potential of women. Half of US states have the potential to add more than 10 percent, and the country’s 50 largest cities can increase GDP by 6 to 13 percent.

While the barriers hindering women from fully participating in the labor market make it unlikely that they will attain full gender equality within a decade, the report finds that in a best-in-class scenario—in which each US state matches the state with the fastest rate of improvement toward gender parity in work over the past decade—some $2.1 trillion of incremental GDP could be added in 2025. That is 10 percent higher than in a business-as-usual scenario.”

[x_button shape=”square” size=”regular” float=”none” href=”http://www.mckinsey.com/global-themes/employment-and-growth/The-power-of-parity-Advancing-womens-equality-in-the-United-States?cid=mckwomen-eml-alt-mgi-mck-oth-1604″ title=”The power of parity: Advancing women’s equality in the United States” target=”blank” info=”none” info_place=”top” info_trigger=”hover”]Read more and download the full report[/x_button]

AAUW Barriers and Bias: The Status of Women in Leadership

AAUW Barriers and Bias: The Status of Women in Leadership

“Women are not new to leadership; think of Cleopatra or Queen Elizabeth. Think of the women who led the civil rights and education reform movements. But women are still outnumbered by men in the most prestigious positions, from Capitol Hill to the board room. Barriers and Bias: The Status of Women in Leadership examines the causes of women’s underrepresentation in leadership roles in business, politics, and education and suggests what we can do to change the status quo.”

Download the 2 page PDF infographic.

[x_button shape=”square” size=”regular” float=”none” href=”http://www.aauw.org/research/barriers-and-bias/” title=”Barriers and Bias: The Status of Women in Leadership ” target=”blank” info=”none” info_place=”top” info_trigger=”hover”]Learn more[/x_button]

Stop Agreeing To Be On All-Male Panels — Just Stop

Stop Agreeing To Be On All-Male Panels — Just Stop

 

“Hey guys! You can do something very simple to help achieve gender equality in the business world. Just say no to all-male panels.

Start immediately.

On Tuesday afternoon, a United Nations-based organization devoted to responsible business practices took a stand on the issue. The executive director of the U.N. Global Compact, Lise Kingo, announced that the organization’s 80 employees will no longer participate in or host all-male panel discussions.

“Too often I’ve been the only woman on a panel. It is time that we challenge the status quo and stop making excuses — there is no shortage of qualified women,” Kingo said in a statement, part of her opening remarks at the Women’s Empowerment Principles annual event in New York.

The U.N. Global Compact plans on urging its 8,500 member companies, including Coca-Cola, Cisco, HP and Johnson & Johnson, to also take the pledge. Notably, some of the biggest tech companies, including Google and Facebook, have not signed on to the Global Compact — a commitment to higher standards on environmental, labor and human rights issues.”

[x_button shape=”square” size=”regular” float=”none” href=”https://hbr.org/2016/03/why-so-many-thirtysomething-women-are-leaving-your-company” title=”Stop Agreeing To Be On All-Male Panels — Just Stop” target=”blank” info=”none” info_place=”top” info_trigger=”hover”]Read the full article.[/x_button]

Women’s Empowerment Principles

Women’s Empowerment Principles

“The Women’s Empowerment Principles are a set of Principles for business offering guidance on how to empower women in the workplace, marketplace and community. They are the result of a collaboration between the United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women (UN Women) and the United Nations Global Compact and are adapted from the Calvert Women’s Principles®. The development of the Women’s Empowerment Principles included an international multi-stakeholder consultation process, which began in March 2009 and culminated in their launch on International Women’s Day in March 2010.

Subtitled Equality Means Business, the Principles emphasize the business case for corporate action to promote gender equality and women’s empowerment and are informed by real-life business practices and input gathered from across the globe. The Women’s Empowerment Principles seek to point the way to best practice by elaborating the gender dimension of corporate responsibility, the UN Global Compact, and business’ role in sustainable development. As well as being a useful guide for business, the Principles seek to inform other stakeholders, including governments, in their engagement with business.

[x_button shape=”square” size=”regular” float=”none” href=”http://weprinciples.org/Site/PrincipleOverview/” title=”Women’s Empowerment Principles” target=”blank” info=”none” info_place=”top” info_trigger=”hover”]Check out the full site.[/x_button]

Vermont Tech Announces Enrollment Targets For Gender Equity Initiative

Vermont Tech Announces Enrollment Targets For Gender Equity Initiative

“At a recent press conference, Vermont Tech announced their initiative to tackle workforce development, economic development and gender equity by significantly increasing participation rates among women in several historically male-dominated fields.  The college has set new annual female enrollment growth targets in civil and environmental engineering technology, computer information technology, computer software engineering, construction management, and mechanical engineering technology.  The enrollment targets project annual growth of nearly 40%, each year for the next three years starting in the fall of 2016. By the end of the project term, Vermont Tech should realize an increase of female participation in these programs from 10% to 24%. The momentum of such growth and lessons learned from the activities of the project’s years should yield even greater participation rates beyond 2018.”

[x_button shape=”square” size=”regular” float=”none” href=”http://www.vtc.edu/news/vermont-tech-announces-enrollment-targets-gender-equity-initiative” title=”Vermont Tech Announces Enrollment Targets For Gender Equity Initiative” target=”blank” info=”none” info_place=”top” info_trigger=”hover”]Read the full article.[/x_button]